Reports 2007

 

The Foundation’s publications present the findings from its research and events on significant contemporary economic, political and social issues in a concise and accessible format. You can download all recent publications free of charge from this site (see link for each publication below).

Health, Retirement and Inequality
Can Germany and the UK learn from each other?

Jennifer Roberts, Nigel Rice, Martin Schellhorn, Andrew Jones, and Lynn Gambin

 

This study attempts to understand the effect of health on the decision of older workers to leave the labour market – a decision which is made within the context of the pension and benefit systems of the UK and Germany. The authors found that health is an extremely important factor in the retirement decision for both men and women in the UK and Germany. The effects of poor health seem to be greater in the UK than Germany. The size of the health effect is larger than that of pension entitlement and income in both countries. The results also suggest that it is health shocks rather than a continual level of poor health that are important in the retirement decision.

 

October 2007

 

  • For a free download of the summary report please click here
  • The full text of the study is downloadable from the University of Sheffield website.
    To download please click here

'Trading Up'
Improving and extending the European carbon market
Conference Report 

6th Conference of the British-German Environment Forum

 

The 2007 Spring European Council in early March decided to target a 20% cut in greenhouse gas (GHG) production by 2020, compared to 1990 levels. The Council also allowed for a 30% cut if an international agreement is reached. This sets a new challenge for policy makers in Europe. Thus the timing of the sixth British-German Environment Forum in Berlin on 26–27 March 2007 - with the aim of developing ideas and consensus to move forward the policy debate on solutions to climate change, and in particular the carbon market – could hardly have been better. The conference heard of the serious problem the world faces in limiting the output of GHGs as countries such as China and India rapidly industrialise. The EU, with the UK and Germany in the vanguard, has led the way in developing mechanisms to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and the meeting heard about the successes – and failings – of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme, and debated how Germany and the UK together might be able to generate the political momentum required to rise to the challenge. The discussions and debates of the bilateral conference in Berlin, involving senior representatives from government, business, research and civil society at national and international level, are summarized in this conference report.

 

July 2007

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (33 KB) please click here
  • For a free download of the complete report (252 KB) please click here
Time Use and Work–Life Balance in Germany and the UK

Frank Bauer, Hermann Groß, Gwen Oliver, Georg Sieglen and Mark Smith

 

Work–life balance has become one of the most pressing issues facing industrial societies such as Germany and the UK. As the proportion of dual-working households grows with women’s increased participation in the labour market, time pressures increase as families seek to co-ordinate and control their working lives. At the same time, pressures from employers can pull in the opposite direction as organisations try to organise time in order to be more responsive, meet consumer demands, and compete both domestically and internationally. This report analyses the time use patterns in working households and demonstrates how there are both considerable similarities and differences in the allocation of time across households and countries.

 

July 2007

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (37 KB) please click here
  • For a free download of the complete report (188 KB) please click here
The Determinants of Investment in Industrial Research and Development in the United Kingdom and in Germany

Michela Vecchi, Ray Barrel, Bettina Becker, Jens Schmidt-Ehmcke and Andreas Stephan

 

Investment in R&D has long been recognised as one of the main determinants of innovation and economic growth. This has led to the adoption of ambitious targets for increased R&D in the Lisbon agenda. But the UK’s chances of meeting those targets are receding: R&D intensity in the UK has actually declined since their adoption. In Germany, over the same period, it has risen significantly and consistently. This report seeks to identify the reasons behind the R&D intensity gap between the two countries and to suggest policies which could increase the amount of investment in R&D undertaken by business enterprises.

 

May 2007

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (29 KB) please click here
  • For a German Executive Summary (33 KB) please click here
  • For free download of complete report (166 KB) please click here
Optimal In-work Support and Employment in Ageing Societies
Britain and Germany compared

Richard Blundell, Mike Brewer, James Browne, Peter Haan, Michal Myck and Viktor Steiner

 

How would the current tax-benefit systems in Britain and Germany have to be reconstructed in order to allow the labour market to cope with ageing societies in these two countries? How could tax-benefit systems help to raise the level of employment by alleviating long-term unemployment, discouraging early retirement and raising the labour market participation of women? These vital policy questions are analysed by the authors.

 

March 2007

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (33 KB) please click here
  • For a German Executive Summary (33 KB) please click here
  • For a free download of the complete report (252 KB) please click here
The Survival and Growth of 'Adolescent' High-Tech Firms in Germany and the UK, 1997–2003

Marc Cowling, Helmut Fryges, Georg Licht and Gordon Murray

 

This report documents over a twelve year period (1991–2003) the continued fortunes of 600 independent New Technology-based Firms (NTBFs) which were founded in Germany or the UK between 1987 and 1996. The authors findings on these firms, often known as ‘high-tech start-ups’, have significant implications for policy makers in the complementary areas of Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

 

January 2007

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (32 KB) please click here
  • For a German Executive Summary (39 KB) please click here
  • For a free download of the complete report (321 KB) please click here