Reports 2003 

 

The Foundation’s publications present the findings from its research and events on significant contemporary economic, political and social issues in a concise and accessible format. You can download all recent publications free of charge from this site (see link for each publication below).

The Future of Professionalised Work

UK and Germany compared

Christel Lane, Frank Wilkinson, Wolfgang Littek, Ulrich Heisig, Jude Browne, Brendan Burchell, Roy Mankelow, Margaret Potton and Roland Tutschner

 

During the last two decades the established professions in the UK and Germany have been challenged by a number of new developments which have given rise to new specialisations, whose members aspire to professional status. This report focuses on how these new developments in the well established legal and pharmacy professions and the emerging professions in psychology and business services have affected professionalised work and have brought about changes in the market, work, and status situation of professional workers, as well as in their well-being and the nature of service provision. Attention is focussed on both cross-national differences in these aspects of professionalised work and on divergences between professions within each society.

 

December 2003, published online only

 

  • For free download of complete report (296 KB) please click here
  • To purchase a hard copy of the report via credit card please click here

Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the UK and Germany

Research and evidence on supply and demand

Anna Dixon, Omer Saka, Julian Le Grand, Annette Riesberg, Susanne Weinbrenner, Reinhard Busse

 

In recent years, the market for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has apparently seen tremendous growth in most countries of the European Union. Similarly, there have been changes in the supply of services including the numbers of practitioners active in the provision of CAM services. The report deals with the current definitions, demand and structures of the supply of complementary and alternative medicine in the United Kingdom and Germany. This analysis of the status quo in the field of CAM use and CAM provision aims to provide the empirical knowledge base necessary for future research into regulation and policy-making in both countries. The report concludes by identifying the potential for future research building on the findings presented here.

 

December 2003, published online only

 

  • For free download of complete report (485 KB) please click here

Modernisierung im britischen und deutschen Gesundheitswesen
Was können wir von einander lernen?
Conference Report 

Anglo-German Foundation

 

Great Britain and Germany have been debating the shortcomings of their health care systems for a good many years. The two countries are approaching modernisation from two different starting points. How the two countries deal with the various challenges, and what alternatives and future strategies they have developed in the health field, was the theme of the conference entitled 'Modernising the British and German health care systems - what can we learn from one another?', that brought together specialists from higher education, the media, think-tanks, the civil service, politics, medicine, and health planning and management in both the public and private sectors. The discussions and debates are summarized in this conference report.

 

November 2003, published online only

 

Press Coverage: Ärzteblatt, Financial Times, Süddeutsche Zeitung

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (34 KB) please click here
  • For a German Executive Summary (34 KB) please click here
  • For a list of participants (21 KB) please click here
  • For free download of complete report (934 KB) please click here

Regional Venture Capital Policy

UK and Germany compared

Ron Martin, Christian Berndt, Britta Klagge, Peter Sunley, Stephan Herten and Rolf Sternberg

 

This report examines the regional complexion of venture capital activity in the UK and Germany over recent years, particularly in the context of spatial concentration versus dispersal. It seeks to identify and explain differences in ‘regional' venture capital policy models between the two countries, and the impacts of those policies to date; and finally to ascertain the scope for further policy development and learning from ‘best practice'.

 

November 2003, ISBN 1-900834-43-X

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (37 KB) please click here
  • For a German Executive Summary (37 KB) please click here
  • For free download of complete report (352 KB) please click here

United we stand?

Trade union mergers - UK and Germany compared

Jeremy Waddington, Marcus Kahmann, Jürgen Hoffmann

 

An ongoing series of mergers has resulted in almost continual change in the structure of British trade unions. By contrast, German trade union structure was a model of stability between 1950 and 1989. Drawing on evidence from four case studies, this comparative analysis traces the development of the merger process in the two countries by reference to pre-merger debates and positioning, the procedures whereby mergers were brought about, and merger outcomes

 

September 2003, ISBN 1-900834-49-9, £15.00

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (27 KB) please click here
  • For a German Executive Summary (30 KB) please click here
  • For free download of complete report (223 KB) please click here
  • To purchase a hard copy of the report via credit card please click here

ICT Skills in the UK and Germany

How companies adapt and react

Hilary Steedman, Karin Wagner, Jim Foreman

 

This study analyses and assesses the contrasting national strategies associated with skill supply for information and communication technologies (ICT) in Britain and Germany. It also examines the impact of these strategies on firms and assesses the usefulness to companies of skills at different qualification levels. It concludes with policy implications for change in publicly financed ICT skill supply strategies that emerge from this analysis.

 

September 2003, ISBN 1-900834-42-1

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (29 KB) please click here
  • For a German Executive Summary (32 KB) please click here
  • For free download of complete report (154 KB) please click here

Standort UK?

German DFI and employment

Ulrich Hoppe, Frank McDonald, Heinz-Josef Tüselmann and David Williams

 

Germany is a significant investor in the UK, providing the second largest source of direct foreign investment (DFI) into the UK in terms of both stock and flow of such investments. This study investigates the quantitative and qualitative employment effects of German DFI into the UK in both home and host countries and sets out to answer questions as how important traditional and embeddedness factors as drivers of DFI into the UK are, whether German DFI creat jobs in the UK, what types of jobs are associated with German DFI into the UK and whether German DFI lead to a loss of jobs and/or a loss of skilled jobs in Germany. The study concludes with an outline of policy implications.

 

September 2003, ISBN 1-900834-41-3

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (30 KB) please click here
  • For a German Executive Summary (33 KB) please click here
  • For free download of complete report (124 KB) please click here

Tomorrow’s Welfare State
Conference Report 

Anglo-German Foundation and Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung

 

The second British–German Trade Union Forum - organised jointly by the Anglo-German Foundation and the Friedrich Ebert Foundation - brought together some 41 representatives of German and British trade unions to discuss the nature and scope of ‘tomorrow’s welfare state’. The meeting was timely, as consensual assumptions that have governed social policy for many decades in both the UK and Germany are being vigorously challenged. The most influential and most powerful impetus for change is coming from the heart of the two centre-left governments that is asking fundamental questions about the nature and funding of the welfare state. The discussions and debates of the bilateral conference in Berlin are summarized in this conference report.

 

August 2003, published online only

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (33 KB) please click here
  • For a German Executive Summary (30 KB) please click here
  • For free download of complete report (100 KB) please click here

Why Invest in Biotechnology, and How?

Britain and Germany compared

Rebecca Harding

 

Germany and the UK have the most highly developed biotechnology structures in Europe, as well as distinctive policy structures. This paper considers those policy structures in the two countries in terms of basic expenditure on research and development and examines policies to stimulate private sector involvement, commercialisation and clustering. It pulls together the literature search and the overview of policy to highlight the key "critical success framework" in each country.

 

April 2003, ISBN 1-900834-40-5

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (27 KB) please click here
  • For free download of complete report (193 KB) please click here
  • To purchase a hard copy of the report via credit card please click here

Current Themes in UK Health Care
How are they approached in Germany?
Conference Report 

Anglo-German Foundation

 

This seminar, organised jointly by the Anglo-German Foundation and the King's Fund, brought together specialists from higher education, the media, think-tanks, the civil service, politics, medicine, and health planning and management in both the public and private sectors to discuss how current issues in UK health care are being approached in Germany. The seminar focused on examining how the German experience can inform three live themes in current health care policy debate and development in the UK: National efforts to improve quality, decentralising power to local communities and encouraging market forces in order to improve performance. The discussions and debates are summarized in this conference report.

 

April 2003, published online only

 

  • For free download of complete report (193 KB) please click here
Decline in the Take-Up of Modern Languages at Degree Level

Catherine Jane Watts

 

Decline in the take-up of modern languages at degree level The last decade has seen declining numbers of students wishing to study modern foreign languages at degree level and university language departments are experiencing serious falls in recruitment. This inquiry explores the reasons for the decline by seeking answers through research interviews with selected undergraduates and sixth-formers as well as heads of modern languages IN schools and modern language programme leaders in the university sector.

 

January 2003, ISBN 1-900834-39-1 28pp, £15.00

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (17 KB) please click here
  • For free download of complete report (156 KB) please click here

Sustaining Food, Sustaining Farmers
Conference Report 

Anglo-German Foundation

 

The fourth conference of the British-German Environment Forum brought together some fifty experts from government, farmers' associations, NGOs, universities and the media in both countries to explore issues of sustainability in agriculture and food production. Forum participants investigated the complex interconnections between agriculture, rural communities, and every part of the food production chain. The discussions and debates are summarized in this conference report.

 

January 2003, published online only

 

  • For an English Executive Summary (26 KB) please click here
  • For a German Executive Summary (27 KB) please click here
  • For free download of complete report (113 KB) please click here