Colloquium Information:

 

 

Health Models Which Work
What Lessons can the UK learn for funding and providing healthcare?

Politeia Health Colloquium

 

Date: 22 July 2003

Location: Politeia

 

The Conference will provide a focus for the detailed discussion of the NHS model and how it compares in terms of structure and funding with other health models. The aim is to encourage serious discussion of reforming future healthcare in the UK by funding the patient, not the system. The intention is to inform the policy debate in the UK about those models where publicly funded healthcare is provided through mixed private, voluntary and state hospitals and doctors. In other successful systems the public funds often go to the user, not the system and the user then chooses from competing private and state bodies. The user can also top up in any number of ways for non-essential care.

 

Our specialist panel will discuss:

 

  • How a similar sum is already used in a number of successful world wide models to provide good comprehensive healthcare with at least as much cover as the NHS (often better).
  • How the UK could work such a scheme and what models could be introduced to deploy a mixture of private and other providers.
  • How the NHS healthcare model has developed in Britain and why: what is it's theoretical and evolutionary basis?
  • How can the original cross-party decision to provide healthcare for all through a mixed system, by a mixture of providers, public, voluntary and private, now replace the failed nationalised model?

 

Speakers:

 

Professor Deepak Lal, Professor of Economics at The University of California, Los Angeles, will discuss the introduction of a National Health Insurance, explaining the economic basis and discussing models from other countries where this system works in practice.

 

George Baum, Director of The Hospital Financing Division, German Ministry of Health and Social Security, will address the German Health Model, emphasising the need for competition at every level to ensure efficiency and high standards and how Germany faces the challenge of health reform for the future.

 

Dr Sheila Lawlor, Director of Politeia, will discuss the problems posed by the NHS model and the alternative proposals which would be more in keeping with the ethos and traditions of this country.

 

The Conference will be attended by officials from Whitehall who specialise in health policy at the Department of Health and the Treasury, politicians from the three parties at Westminster, journalists from the national press, academic economists, business people, health specialists (e.g. NHS Trusts and Local Authorities), members of the medical profession, representatives from private healthcare companies, and people from the Royal Colleges of General Practitioners and Physicians.

 

Contact: Politeia, 22 Charing Cross Road, call 020 7240 5070 or email: [email protected]